Animal Welfare Bill


Addressing Human-Elephant Conflict in Sri Lanka

 Author: Ashan Karunananda

The Sri Lankan Elephant has been a symbolic figure in the past and present. In fact, historical information proves a relationship that has begun over 5,000 years ago. However, over the past years the human population has seen a rapid increase which has caused severe problems to this strong relationship. In 2019 alone, a total of 405 elephants and 121 humans have died as a result of human-elephant conflict, which leaves many questions to be answered.

Today, the Sri Lankan Elephant (Elephas maximus maximus) is considered an endangered species by IUCN as its populations have decreased by more than 50% over the past years. The main reasons for this rapid decrease are habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation, as well as the rapid incline of the human populations. The elephants are now more concentrated in the dry zone, including Wilpattu National Park, Yala National Park, Udawalawe National Park, and Minneriya National Park. It is estimated that Sri Lanka has the highest elephant density in Asia. However, over the past decade, human-elephant conflict has increased, resulting in death for humans and elephants.

Addressing Human-Elephant Conflict

There are several ways to address human-elephant conflict. These include:

  1. Setting up protected areas and ecological corridors

The establishment of protected areas which provide feeding, breeding, and residing habitats to the elephants could play a key role in addressing human-elephant conflict in Sri Lanka.  These areas will physically separate humans and elephants. Furthermore, leaving corridors that connect fragmented habitats will provide more areas for these mammals to graze. The presence of corridors supports the elephants in their seasonal migration and also helps them to find food during the dry season.

  1. Building electric fences

Among the priority actions taken to address human-elephant conflict is the construction of electric fences in areas where human-elephant conflict is severe. However, it is important that these fences are set up following scientific studies to identify suitable areas which take into consideration factors such as the number of elephants present in the region and the area in which the elephants will be concentrated after building the fence. Additionally, this needs to take into consideration the wellbeing of the elephants, the sufficiency of food resources, sufficiency of land resources, and the potential conflicts within the elephant herd in the area. Furthermore, it is essential that there is regular monitoring as well as maintenance to ensure that the fences are not damaged and remain in good quality. 

  1. Use of acoustic deterrent devices

Farmers have long used acoustic deterrents such as shouting and fire crackers to chase away elephants entering their fields. The use of acoustic devices could replace these methods and utilize sounds that don’t harm the elephants or other animals. This is important because, farmers usually stay up whole night while guarding their cultivation which effects their day to day activities. The importance of the implementation of automated deterrent devices is a vital requirement.

  1. Light devices

The use of lighting such as bonfires, torches, and flash lights can help to chase away the elephants. This process can be made more efficient by using solar flashlights which is sustainable. These lights can be distributed among farmers and fixed in strategic locations to cover the whole agricultural land. As per the Annual Report 2019 of the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society of Sri Lanka, the implementation of light repel systems has shown positive results in preventing the elephants from entering cultivated lands. However, farmers must follow up on the maintenance to ensure the efficiency of the process. 

  1. Use of natural methods 

Elephants are fond of crops such as paddy. By growing less attractive crops together with these crops, farmers can reduce the impacts of elephants on their cultivation.  More importantly, crops that serve as repellents as well as those that provide financial benefits to farmers could be considered as options to be cultivated. These include crops such as ginger, onion, cinnamon, garlic, and citrus plants.

  1. Translocation

The most problematic elephants that damage houses, feed on crops, and even kill humans can be tranquilized and transported to another location. However, studies have shown that translocated elephants return to their original territory after some time. Therefore, this is not a long-term solution for human-elephant conflict.

  1. Compensation 

It is important to financially protect farmers from the damages caused by elephants to their cultivation and property. Compensation and insurance schemes can build the resilience of farmers and foster a more positive attitude toward the elephants. A financial safety net reduces pressure on farmers and prevents them from resorting to violence such as guns, poison, or explosives to chase away elephants.

  1. Awareness creation among communities 

Individuals and reputed organizations must take these initial steps to protect these terrestrial giants for future generation. This can be done by conducting awareness programs to the locals affected by this problem. They can be briefed on why there has been a rise in human-elephant conflict and proper methods to address it can be explained to it. Especially, farmers can be briefed on the use of new technology which can be used to prevent this problem. More importantly, these programs could include how humane ways to address human elephant conflict could be used, through increased awareness among communities. The aim is for the animals and humans to live in harmony, and not to use aggressive methods to chase off animals which were potentially living on this land long before it was settled by humans.

Conclusion

In conclusion, human-elephant conflict is increasing rapidly with the highest number of human and elephant deaths reported during the last year. Furthermore, with the available statistical evidence this problem will be increasing in future, if prompt actions are not taken. Protected areas, corridors, electric fencing, acoustic and light devices, natural methods, compensation and risk transfer, and awareness creation can all play a part in mitigating conflict and allow for a peaceful coexistence between humans and elephants.

References

Fernando, P., Wikramanayake, E., Weerakoon, D., Jayasinghe, L., Gunawardena, M., & Janaka, H. (2005). Perceptions and patterns of human–elephant conflict in old and new settlements in Sri Lanka: insights for mitigation and management. Biodiversity and Conservation, 14, 2465-2481.

 A Potential Experiment on HEC Mitigation. Wild Life and Nature Protection Society of Sri Lanka 2020.

Perera, B. O. (2009). The Human-Elephant Conflict: A Review of Current Status and Mitigation Methods. Gajaha, 30, 41-52.

Prakash, L., W, W. A., & Fernando, P. (2020). Human-Elephant Conflict in Sri Lanka: Patterns and Extent. Gajah 51, 16-25.

Santiapillai, C., & Read, B. (2010). Would masking the smell of ripening paddy-fields help mitigate human–elephant conflict in Sri Lanka? Flora & Fauna International, 44(4), 509-511.

Santiapillai, C., Wijeyamohan, S., Bandara, G., Athurupana, R., Dissanayake, N., & Read, B. (2010). AN ASSESSMENT OF THE HUMAN-ELEPHANT CONFLICT IN SRI LANKA. Ceylon Journal of Science (Biological Scences), 39(1), 21-33.

Shaffer, L. J., Khadka, K. K., Van Den Hoek, J., & Naithani, K. J. (2019). Human-Elephant Conflict: A Review of Current Management Strategies and Future Directions. frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

Supun Lahiru Prakash, T. G., Wijeratne, A. W., & Fernando, P. (2020). Human-Elephant Conflict in Sri Lanka: Patterns and Extent. Gajah, 16-25.

Wickramasinghe, K. (2019, October 8). Habarana Suspicions raised over elephant deaths. Daily Mirror Online.

Yapa, A., & Ratnavira, G. (2013). Mammals of Sri Lanka. Colombo: Field Ornithology Group of Sri Lanka.

Zhang, L., & Wang, N. (2003). An initial study on habitat conservation of Asian elephant (Elephas maximus), with a focus on human elephant conflict in Simao, China. ELSEVIER, 112, 453-459.


ශ්‍රිපාද වනබිමේ කළු කොටි රජුට ජීවිතය අහිමි වූයේ කාගේ වරදින් ද?

සතුන්ට ආදරය කරන බොහෝ දෙනෙකුගේ නෙතගට කඳුලක් එක් කරමින් නල්ලතන්නිය, ලක්ෂපාන වතුයායේ, වාලමලෙයි කෝවිල අසල එළවළු කොටුවක මද්දකට (මළපුඩුවකට) අසු වූ දුර්ලභ කළු කොටියා මියගියේ 2020 මැයි 29 වැනිදාය.

ඒ, මද්දට අසු වී දින තුනකට පසුවය. වනජීවී සංරක්ෂණ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව දිවා රෑ නොබලා කළ ප්‍රතිකාර ගඟට කැපූ ඉනි මෙන් විය. දැන් බොහෝ දෙනෙකු වෙහෙසෙන්නේ  නල්ලතන්නියේ මළපුඩුවකට අසුව සොයාගත් කළු කොටියා  වෛද්‍ය  ප්‍රතිකාර ලබමින් මියගියේ කාගේ වරදින්දැයි විමසා බැලීම  සඳහාය. 

ශ්‍රි ලංකාවේ කළු කොටි 

ලොව වෙසෙන කොටි සියල්ල Panthera pardus විශේෂයට ඇතුලත්වන අතර, එහි උප විශේෂ 8ක් දැනට විද්‍යාත්මකව හඳුනාගෙන ඇත.  ඒ අතුරින්, ලංකාවේ වෙසෙන උප විශේෂය (Panthera pardus kotiya) මෙරටට ආවේණිකය. වඳවී යාමේ තර්ජනයට ලක්ව ඇති සත්ත්ව විශේෂයක් ලෙස සැලකෙන ශ්‍රී ලංකා කොටියාගේ ගහනය, 2015 වසරේ සංඛ්‍යාලේඛණවලට අනුව 700-950ක් පමණ වේ. දිවයින පුරා පැතිරුණු වනාන්තර ආශ්‍රිතව ශ්‍රී ලංකා කොටියාගේ විසිරි ව්‍යාප්තියක් දක්නට හැක. 

කළු කොටියා ලෙස හැදින්වෙන්නේ මෙම උප විශේෂයේ වර්ණ ප්‍රභේදයකි. Melanism ලෙස හැඳින්වෙන මෙම සත්ත්ව විද්‍යාත්මක ආකාරයේදී, උන්ගේ දේහයේ ඇති ඇඳුරු නැතහොත් කළු වර්ණක ඉස්මතුවී පෙනේ. කොටියාගේ සමේ මෙසේ කළු වර්ණය නිර්මාණය වන්නේ නිලීන ජානයකිනි. කෙසේ වෙතත්, කොටි සමේ ඇති සුපුරුදු පුල්ලි රටාව මේ කළු වර්ණය අතරින් හඳුනාගත හැක.  

කඳුකර කලාපයේ වැඩි වශයෙන් දක්නට ලැබෙන කළු කොටියන් දුර්ලභය.  අඳුරු පරිසරයට සහ ශීත කාලගුණයට ඔරොත්තුදීම සඳහා මෙසේ වර්ණ විපර්යාස සිදුවන බවට මතයක් ඇත. අඳුරු පරිසරයේ සාර්ථකව දඩයම් කිරීමටත්, සතුරන්ගෙන් ආරක්ෂාවීමටත් කළු වර්ණය උපකාර වේ.

කළු කොටි කිහිප දෙනෙකු සම්බන්ධයෙන් පසුගිය දශක දෙකක කාලය තුළ විවිධ වාර්තා ඉදිරිපත්වී තිබේ. එම වාර්තාවන්ට අනුව, මෙයට පෙර කළු කොටි තිදෙනෙකු  දඩයක්කරුවන්ගේ ඉලක්කයට හසුවූ පසුව සොයා ගැණිනි. ඔවුන් සියලු දෙනා  සිංහරාජ වනාන්තරය ආශ්‍රිතව ජීවත්වූවන්ය.  

මෙරට අවසන් කළු කොටියා ලෙස දශකයකට ආසන්න කාලයක් හඳුනාගෙන තිබුණේ පිටදෙණිය, මාවුල්දෙණිය ප්‍රදේශය ආශ්‍රිතව උගුලකට හසුව මිය ගිය කළු කොටියාය. ගිරිතලේ වනජීවි  කෞතුකාගාරයේ එම සත්ත්වයාගේ ජීවමාන අනුරුවක් නිර්මාණය වුයේ, දුර්ලභ කළු කොටින්ගේ අවාසනාවන්ත අවසානය කියා පෑමට මෙනි. 

ජීවමාන කළු කොටි ගැන මෑත වාර්තාව 

දඩයම්කරුවන්ගේ මළපුඩුවලට අසුව මියගොස් සිටියදී හමු වූවද, කිසිදා කළු කොටියෙකුගේ  ජීවමානව සාක්ෂි හමුවී නොතිබිණි. මේ නිසා කළු කොටි ගැන විශේෂ අවධානයක් නොතිබිණි. මෙසේ තිබියදී, ලද තොරතුරකට අනුව 2019 ඔක්තොම්බර් 26 වැනිදා වනජීවි සංරක්ෂණ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවේ දුරස්ථ චලන සංවේදී කැමරාවකට කළු කොටියකු පටිගත කරගැනීමට හැකිවිය.

ඒ මධ්‍යම කඳුකරයේ, ශ්‍රිපාද රක්ෂිතයේ නල්ලතන්නියට ආසන්නයෙනි.  නමුත් මෙම තොරතුරු මාධ්‍යට නිකුත් කෙරුනේ පසුගිය ජනවාරි මාසයේය. අදාල කළු කොටියා සමග ජීවත්වන කොටි පවුලක් පිළිබඳව තොරතුරු එම වකවානුවේ හෙළි විය. 

වනජීවි පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන මෙම හෙළිදරව්ව කරමින් එකල  ප්‍රකාශ කළේ මෙසේ වාර්තාවූ කළු කොටියා අවුරුදු 5ක පමණ, හොඳින්  වැඩුණු පිරිමි සතෙකු බවයි. අදාල පටිගත කිරීමට මුලිකත්වය ගෙන තිබුණේද ඔහුය. මෙම කළු කොටියා සමග තවත් ගැහැණු සතෙක්, පැටව් දෙදෙනෙකු සහ සාමාන්‍ය වර්ණ දරණ පිරිමි සතෙකු සිටින බව අනාවරණය විය.

මද්දකට හසුවු  නල්ලතන්නියෙ කළු කොටියා

2020 මැයි 26 වැනිදා ලක්ෂපාන වතුයායේ, වාලමලෙයි කෝවිල අසල එළවළු කොටුවක මද්දකට  කළු කොටියකු හසුවිය.  ඌරන්ගෙන් එළවළු කොටුව ආරක්ෂා කිරීමටත්, දඩයමටත් දෙකටම මෙම එළවළු කොටුවේ ත්‍රීරෝද කේබලයකින් මළපුඩුවක්  අටවා තිබී ඇත. මෙම මද්දට හසුව තිබුණේ නල්ලතන්නියේ දුර්ලභ කළු කොටියාය. 

හිමිදිරි උදෑසන මද්දෙන් බේරීමට කළු කොටියෙකු දඟලනු දුටු එළවළු කොටුවේ හිමිකරු නල්ලතන්නිය පොලිස් ස්ථානය දැනුවත් කළේය. පොලීසිය වහාම නල්ලතන්නිය වනජීවි කාර්යාලය දැනුවත් කළේය. ඒ අනුව, අඩවි ආරක්ෂක නිලධාරි ප්‍රභාෂ් කරුණාතිලක ඇතුළු කණ්ඩායමක් එම ස්ථානයට පැමිණියේය. වනජීවි පශුවෛද්‍යවරුන්වන මාලක අබේවර්ධන සහ අකලංක පිණිදිය එම ස්ථානයට ළඟාවූයේ උඩවලව ඇත් අතුරු සෙවණේ සිටය. ඒ වනවිට පැය කිහිපයක් ගතවී තිබු අතර වතුකරයේ ජනතාව තුන්දහසක් පමණ කළු කොටියා බැලීමට පැමිණීම නිසා, මද්දෙන් බේරී පලායාමට තැත්කිරීමේදී කළු කොටිය මහත් වෙහෙසට පත්ව තිබිණ.

නිර්වින්දනය කළ කළු කොටියාට ප්‍රතිකාර කිරීම

පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන කළු කොටියා නිර්වින්දනය කළ අතර අනෙකුත් වනජීවි නිලධාරින් හා ප්‍රදේශවාසීන්ගේ සහය ඇතිව මුදා ගැනීම සහ ප්‍රතිකාර කිරීම ඇරඹිණි. එම ස්ථානයේදී ලබා දුන් මූලික ප්‍රතිකාරවලින් පසුව, කළ කළු කොටියා උඩවලව ඇත් අතුරු සෙවණට ගෙනයාමට තීරණය කෙරිණ. ඒ ප්‍රතිකාර ලබාදීමෙන් පසු කොටියා නැවත වනයට මුදාහැරීමේ බලාපොරොත්තු ඇතිවය.

නිර්වින්දනය කිරීමෙන් පසුව කළු කොටියා මද්දෙන් මුදා ගැනීමේදී නැට්ටෙන් අල්ලා ඇදීම වැනි ක්‍රියා නිසා මෙම මුදාගැනීමේ ක්‍රියාවලිය නිසි ආකාරයකට සිදු නොවු බවටත්, නල්ලතන්නියට වඩා පාරිසරිකව වෙනස්, දුරකින් පිහිටි උඩවලවට කළු කොටියා ප්‍රතිකාර සදහා ගෙනයාම ස්ථානෝචිත නොවන බවත් පරිසරවේදීහු පෙන්වා දුන්හ.

ඒ කෙසේ වෙතත්, එදින රාත්‍රියේ රටටම අසන්නට ලැබුණු සතුටුදායක පුවත  වුයේ කළු කොටියා ප්‍රකෘතියෙන් පසුවන බවයි. ඒ අනුව කළු කොටියා සුවවීමේ ප්‍රීතිය සත්ත්වලෝලීන් අතර වේගයෙන් පැතිර ගියේය. 

කළු කොටියා බේරා ගැනීම නිශ්ඵල වු ඇත් අතුරු සෙවණේ මෙහෙයුම 

සමාජ මාධ්‍ය සටහනකට අනුව, කළු කොටියා වතුර බීමට පටන් ගැනීම පවා පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන ඇතුළු වෛද්‍ය කණ්ඩායමේ ප්‍රීතිය ඉහවහා යාමට කරුණක් වී තිබිණි. 

‘අන්න වතුර බොන්න පටන් ගත්තා!’, මාලකට එකවරම කෑ ගැසුණේය. සිරිපා වනබිම රජ කළ ඒ දැවැන්තයා ඉතා අපහසුවෙන් වතුර බොමින් සිටියේය. ‘ඔය ගෙනාවට පස්සෙ වතුර බොන දෙවෙනි පාර.’ පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක නැවතත් නිහඬතාව බිදිමින් එතැනි සිටි අයෙකුට කීවේය.

මුදාගත් පසු දෙවැනි දින ලබා ලබාදුන් මස් කිලෝවකට ආසන්න ප්‍රමාණයක් කොටියා ආහාරයට ගත් බව පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන පවසයි.  කොටියා දිනෙන් දින සුව වෙනු ඇතැයි ඔවුහු විශ්වාස කළෝය. නමුත් තෙවැනි දිනය වෙන විට කළු කොටියා පැත්ත වැටී සිටියේය.

කෙසේ වුවද පේරාදේණිය පශුවෛද්‍ය පීඨයේ මහාචාර්ය නෙරංජලා ද සිල්වා සමග පශුවෛද්‍යවරුන්වන අකලංක පිණිදිය, ශෂිකලා ගමගේ, කලනි සමරකෝන්, තාරක ප්‍රසාද් ඇතුළු කණ්ඩායම මෙම උත්සාහය අත්නොහැර කළු කොටියා බේරා ගැනීමට උත්සාහ දැරූහ.

මද්දට අසුවීමෙන් සහ ඉන් අනතුරුව කටේ සහ සමේ ඇතිවු තුවාලයන්ට අමතරව කළු කොටියාගේ මීට පෙර සිදුවු තුවාල දෙකකුත් තිබුණා යැයි පශුවෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන පැවැසීය. 

කළු කොටියා මද්ද සමග කණ්ඩියෙන් පහළට වැටීමේදී බෙල්ල තැලීම, මොළයට හා ස්වාසනාලයට හානි වී තිබු බව පශු වෛද්‍ය මාලක අබේවර්ධන පවසයි.

කළු කොටියාගේ අවසන් මොහොත 

2020 මැයි 29 වැනිදා උදෑසන 10.30ට පමණ අවසන් හුස්ම වාතලයට මුසු කළ කළු කොටියා, තවත් බොහෝ  සතුන්ට අත්ව ඇති ඉරණම ලෝකය හමුවේ තබමින් නික්ම ගියේය. මාධ්‍ය වාර්තා අනුව, මෙසේ නික්ම ගියේ කැමරාවක සටහන්වී සිය වර්ගය පිළිබඳව බලාපොරොත්තුවක් ලෝකය හමුවේ තැබු ශ්‍රිපාද වනබිම සැරිසැරූ කළු කොටියාය.

පරිසරවේදීන්ගේ අදහස් හා යෝජනා

කොටියා ආරක්ෂිත සත්ත්වයෙක්. වනසත්ත්ව හා වෘක්ෂලතා ආරක්ෂා කිරීමේ ආඥාපනතේ 30 වැනි වගන්තියේ දෙවැනි උප වගන්තිය අනුව එවන් සතෙකු අල්ලා ගැනීම, තුවාල කිරීම, මරණයට පත්කිරීම වරදක්. ඒ නිසා ඉදිරියේදී අවශ්‍ය නීතිමය මැදිහත්වීම් සිදුකිරීමට අප සුදානම් යැයි  නීතිඥ ජගත් ගුණවර්ධන පවසයි.

එමෙන්ම විශේෂ වනජීවී බුද්ධි ඒකකයක් ස්ථාපිත කොට වරදකරුවන් අත්අඩංගුවට ගැනීම සහ නූතන තාක්ෂණික ප්‍රවේශයක් ගැනීම පිළිබදව පරිසරවේදීහු මේ වනවිටත් අදහස් දක්වා තිබේ. කඳුකරයේ වාර්තාවන කොටින්ට සබැදි අනතුරු ඉහළයන නිසා, ඒ ප්‍රදේශයේ ක්ෂණික මුදාගැනීම් මෙහෙයුම් සිදුකළ හැකි වනජීවී සංරක්ෂණ කණ්ඩායමක් ස්ථාපිත කළ යුතුව ඇතැයි ස්ලයිකැන් භාරයේ උපදේශිකා පශුවෛද්‍ය දීපානි ජයන්තා මෙනවිය පැවසුවාය.

කළු කොටියා මියයෑම ඇතුළු වනජීවින් සම්බන්ධයෙන් උද්ගතව තිබෙන මෙම තත්ත්වය සම්බන්ධයෙන් නීතිඥ වොසිතා විජේනායක මහත්මියගෙන් කළ විමසීමේදී ඇය මෙසේ පැවසුවාය.

‘දඩයම් කිරීමේ සිද්ධීන්වල සිට කළු කොටියාගේ මරණය දක්වා ශ්‍රී ලංකාවේ වන ජීවීන්ට ඇති තර්ජන බොහෝමයකි. ඒ නිසා වනජීවීන් ආරක්ෂා කිරීමට අදාළ නීති බලාත්මක කිරීමේ අවශ්‍යතාව මෙවැනි සිදුවීම් ඔස්සේ නැවත නැවත  අවධාරණය වන්නක්. දඩයම්කරුවකුගේ මද්දකට බිලිවු මෙම කළු කොටියාත්, මෑත කාලයේ දඩයම්කරුවකුගේ වෙඩි තැබීමකට ලක්ව මියගිය වනජීවි නිලධාරියාත් දෙස බැලුවිට පෙනීයන්නේ මෙම තත්ත්වය තුළ අවශ්‍ය අවස්ථාවල දී අදාළ බලධාරීන්ට ගැටළු විසඳීම සඳහා ඕනෑකරන විවිධ සහය ලබාදීම අප විසින් සහතික කළ යුතු බවයි. මීට අමතරව මහජනයා අතර දැනුවත්භාවය ඇති කිරීම වැදගත් වන අතර එමඟින් අපගේ වනජීවීන් මෙවැනි කුරිරු මරණ වලින් ආරක්ෂා කර ගැනීමට හැකියාව ලැබෙනවා’ යැයි ඇය විශ්වාසය පළ කළාය.

අධිකරණ ක්‍රියාමාර්ගය

එළවළු කොරටුවේ මද්ද තැබු බවට පොලිසිය විසින් සැකපිට අත්අඩංගුවට ගත් කොරටු හිමියාට මේ වනවිට ඇප ලැබී තිබේ. මේ අතර මියගිය කළු කොටියාගේ පශ්චාත් මරණ පරීක්ෂණය පේරාදෙණිය විශ්වවිද්‍යාලයේ, පශුවෛද්‍ය පීඨයේදී සිදු කිරීමට හැටන් මහේස්ත්‍රාත් අධිකරණය නියෝග කළේය.

ඒ සඳහා මිය ගිය කළු කොටියාගේ දේහය මැයි 29 වැනිදා පස්වරුවේ උඩවලවේ සිට පේරාදෙණියට රැගෙන ගිය බව වනජීවී සංරක්ෂණ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවේ මාධ්‍ය නිලධාරිනී හෂිනි සරත්චන්ද්‍ර මෙනවිය පැවසුවාය.

වන සතෙකු මියගිය විට පශ්චාත් මරණ පරීක්ෂණය සාමාන්‍යයෙන් වනජීවී සංරක්ෂණ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවේ පශුවෛද්‍යවරු විසින් සිදු කළද, බොහෝ දෙනාගේ අවධානයක් යොමුව ඇති කළු කොටියාගේ මරණ පරීක්ෂණය මෙසේ පේරාදෙණිය පශුවෛද්‍ය පීඨයේදී පැවැත්වීමට  අවසර දෙන මෙන් වනජීවි සංරක්ෂණ දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව අධිකරණයෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටියේය.

මිනිසුන්ට මෙන්ම සත්ත්වයන්ටද ජීවත්වීමේ අයිතිය පොදුය. දුර්ලභ කළු කොටියා පමණක් නොව සුලබ සත්ත්වයකුවුවද රැක ගැනීම මිනිසත්කම විය යුතුය. අප සොයා යා යුත්තේ එයයි. ඒසේ නොවන්නට, අහිමිවන කළු කොටි ගණන් කරමින් සිටිනවා හැර වෙනයමක් ඉතිරිවන්නේ නැත.

රමේෂ් වරල්ලෙගම 


බලු පැටව් පොළොවෙ ගසා මරද්දී සත්ත්ව සුබසාධන පනතට බාලගිරි

සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත සම්බන්ධයෙන් මෙරට බොහෝ දෙනෙක් උනන්දු වෙති. එසේ වුවද අදාල කෙටුම්පතට සිදුවන්නේ කුමක්දැයි නිශ්චිතව දන්නේ කවුරුන්ද ? ඊට විමසිලිමත්වත්වන්නෝ බොහෝය. නමුත් ඔවුන්ගේ උනන්දුවේ තරමටවත් පසුගිය කාලයේ ඊට සාධාරණයක් සිදුවූයේ දැයි විමසා බැලිය යුතුය.

සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පතේ මෑත කාලීන දිග හැරුම  වසර පහළොවකටත් වැඩි අතීතයක් කරා දිව යයි. විවිධ මට්ටමෙන් වාචිකව සන්නිවේදනය වෙමින් තිබු මෙම සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත යම් ඉදිරි පිම්මක් තැබුවේ 2015 වසරේදී සිදු කළ මහජන මත විමසීම හරහාය.

2016 ජනවාරි 13 වැනිදා ඊට කැබිනට් අනුමැතිය ලද බවට විවිධ ස්ථිරවල කතාබහ වෙයි. ඉන් සිදුව ඇත්තේ සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පතක නව අවශ්‍යතාව සදහා අමාත්‍ය මණ්ඩල අනුමැතියද ලැබුණු බවයි. ඇතැම්විට මෙම කාරණාව එවකට සමාජගත වුයේ සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත නීතියක් බවට පත්වීම එමගින් සිදුවුවා යැයි හැගෙන පරිදිය. නමුත් සිදුවුයේ වෙනකකි.

සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව ඔස්සේ පාර්ලිමේන්තුවට ඉදිරිපත්කොට පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ බහුතර බලයෙන් එය පනතක් ලෙස සම්මත වීම දක්වා ක්‍රියාවලියේ, නීති කෙටුම්පත් කාර්ය ඉදිරියට ගෙනයාමට පමණක් අදාල කැබිනට් අනුමැතිය නෛතික පිළිගැනීමකට ලක්වී තිබිණි.

රජය සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධණ පනත් කෙටුම්පත පිළිගත්තාය යන්න නිල වශයෙන්  පිළිගැණුනද ? එය නීතියක් දක්වා ගෙනයාමේ අති දුෂ්කර කාර්යට රාජ්‍ය මට්ටමෙන් ලැබුණේද ? ලැබෙමින් පවතිනුයේ ද ?  එතැන් සිට මන්දගාමී ප්‍රතිචාරයකි.

1907 සත්ත්ව හිංසනය වැළැක්වීමේ ආඥා පනත ඔස්සේ  සත්ත්ව සුබසාධනය පිළිබදව කරුණු අන්තර්ගත කළද, සත්ත්ව හිංසනය පිළිබද නීතිය අවසන්වරට සංශෝධනය වුයේ 1955දීය. ඒ අනුව ගත් කලද වසර 65ක් තිස්සේ මෙම නීති සංශෝධනය වීමක් සිදුව නැත. 

2010 වසරේදී අතුරලියේ රතන හිමි පෞද්ගලික මන්ත්‍රි යෝජනාවක් ලෙස පාර්ලිමේන්තුවට සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත ඉදිරිපත් කළ ද,පාර්ලිමේන්තු  න්‍යාය පුස්තකයට සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත ඉදිරිපත් නොවුයේ එය අවසන් කෙටුම්පතක් ලෙස නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව සහ ආදාල අමාත්‍යංශ මැදිහත්වීම ඔස්සේ පාර්ලිමේන්තුවට නෛතික ක්‍රමවේදය ඔස්සේ අවසන් වශයෙන් ඉදිරිපත් නොවීම නිසාය. 

ඇත්තටම සිදුවුයේ කලින් කලට විෂයභාර  අමාත්‍යංශය සහ නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව අතර  සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත දෝලනය වීමයි. නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවේ නීති සකස් කිරීමේ ක්‍රියාවලිය පිරික්සා බැලීමේදී මේ පිළිබදව පුළුල් අදහසක් ලබාගත හැකිය. 

අදාල නෛතික ක්‍රියාවලියේ සිදුවන පහත සදහන් ක්‍රියාවලියන් සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත වෙනුවෙන් මේ දක්වා ක්‍රියාත්මක වී නොමැති බව ඔබට වටහා ගත හැකිය.

අමාත්‍ය මණ්ඩලය විසින් පනත් කෙටුම්පත රජයේ ගැසට් පත්‍රයෙහි පළ කිරීම අනුමත කරනු ලැබු විට, අමාත්‍යාංශය විසින් පනත් කෙටුම්පත භාෂාත්‍රයෙන් ම රජයේ මුද්‍රණාලයාධිපති වෙත ඉදිරිපත් කළ යුතු ය. පනත් කෙටුම්පත පළමුවෙන්ම රජයේ ගැසට් පත්‍රයෙහි අතිරේකයක් ලෙසින් පළ කරනු ලබන අතර, භාෂාත්‍රයෙන් මුද්‍රණය කරනු ලැබූ කෙටුම්පත අවසන් සෝදුපත් කියවීම සහ අනුමැතිය සඳහා මුද්‍රණාලයාධිපති විසින් නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක වෙත යවනු ලැබේ.

පනත් කෙටුම්පත රජයේ ගැසට් පත්‍රයෙහි පළ කරනු ලැබූ විට ආණ්ඩුක්‍රම ව්‍යවස්ථාව ප්‍රකාර එය පළ කරනු ලැබූ දිනයෙන් දින 14 ක් ඉකුත් වීමෙන් පසුව, එය පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ න්‍යාය පත්‍රයට ඇතුළත් කළ යුතු ය. පාර්ලිමේන්තුව වෙත ඉදිරිපත් කිරීමෙන් (පළමුවර කියවීමෙන්) පසුව පාර්ලිමේන්තුව විසින් එය පනත් කෙටුම්පතක ස්වරූපයෙන් මුද්‍රණය කරන මෙන් පාර්ලිමේන්තු මහලේකම්වරයා වෙත නියම කරමින් එයට අංකයක් ලබාදෙනු ඇත.

පනත් කෙටුම්පතක් පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ න්‍යාය පත්‍රයට ඇතුළත් කරනු ලැබූ විට එය දෙවැනි වර කියවීමේ විවාදය සඳහා දිනයක් (පනත් කෙටුම්පත ඉදිරිපත් කරනු ලැබූ දින සිට දින හතකට කලින් නොවන දිනයක්) නියම කරනු ලැබේ. එම කාලසීමාව ලබා දී ඇත්තේ යම් පුරවැසියකුට එම පනත් කෙටුම්පත ශ්‍රේෂ්ඨාධිකරණය ඉදිරියේ අභියෝගයට ලක් කිරීම සඳහා ය. විවාදයට භාජනය කෙරෙන කරුණු සම්බන්ධයෙන් පැන නගින යම් වෙනස් කිරීම් කාරක සභා අවස්ථා සංශෝධන මාර්ගයෙන් සිදු කරනු ලැබිය හැක්කේ දෙවැනි වර කියැවීමෙන් පසුව පැවැත්වෙන පනත් කෙටුම්පතේ කාරක සභා අවස්ථාවේ දී ය. අමාත්‍ය මණ්ඩලය විසින් මුල් අවස්ථාවේ දී අනුමත කරනු ලැබූ ප්‍රතිපත්තියට බැහැරව අලුතින් කිසිදු කරුණක් කාරක සභා අවස්ථා සංශෝධන මාර්ගයෙන් ඇතුළත් කරනු නොලැබිය යුතු ය.

සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ පනතක් ලෙස සම්මතවීම සදහා අවශ්‍ය ඉහත කාරණා මේ දක්වා ඉටුවී නොමැත. 

ඒ නිසා, පාර්ලිමේන්තුවේ හමස් පෙට්ටියේ තබා ඇති සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනතක් නැත. ඇත්තටම සිදුව ඇත්තේ අමාත්‍යංශ මට්ටමෙන් ඊට ලැබෙන නිද්‍රාශීලි ප්‍රතිපත්තියයි. කලෙන් කලට අමාත්‍යංශ හා විෂය පථ පමණක් නොව අමාත්‍යංශ ගොඩනැගිලි මාරුවන අවස්ථාවලදීද සත්ත්ව සුබසාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පතට එය අහිතකර ලෙස බලපා තිබේ.

2017 වසරේදී නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව විසින් සත්ත්ව සුබසාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත සංස්කරණවලින් අනතුරුව එවකට විෂය පථය භාර ග්‍රාමීය කටයුතු අමාත්‍යංශයට එය පැවැරුවේය. එතැන් පටන් මේ දැක්වා නැවත නැවතත් සිදුවන්නේ කුමක්ද ? නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව සහ විෂය භාර අමාත්‍යංශය අතර අඩු ලුහුඩු කම් සැකසීමේ ක්‍රියාපටිපාටියයි.

දැනට පවතින තත්ත්වය නම් නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවෙන් මහවැලි,කෘෂිකර්ම,වාරිමාර්ග සහ ග්‍රාමීය සංවර්ධන අමාත්‍යංශයට එවැනි යෝජනා ඇතුළත් කොට නැවත යොමුකළ කෙටුම්පත නැවත නීති කෙටුම්පත් සම්පාදක දෙපාර්තමේන්තුවට ඉදිරිපත් කිරීමට සැකසීම දක්වා වු කාර්ය බව ජාතික ආහාර ප්‍රවර්ධන මණ්ඩලයේ හිටපු සභාපති වෛද්‍ය සෑම් ඩැනියෙල් මහතා පැවැසීය.

මම විශ්‍රාම යාමට පෙර අදාල පනත් කෙටුම්පත අමාත්‍යංශයට යොමු වුවා. නමුත් මැතිවරණ සහ අමාත්‍යංශය ස්ථාපිතව පැවැති ස්ථාන වෙනස්වීම වැනි කාරණා හේතුවෙන් අදාල කටයුතු තවම අවසන් නැති බවයි විශ්වාස කරන්නෙයැයි හෙතම සදහන් කළේය.

මේ සම්බන්ධයෙන් මහවැලි,කෘෂිකර්ම,වාරිමාර්ග සහ ග්‍රාමීය සංවර්ධන අමාත්‍යංශය දුරකථනය ඔස්සේ සම්බන්ධ කරගනිමින් වගකිව යුතු පාර්ශවයකින් අදාල තොරතුරු මුලාශු කර ගැනීමට ගත් උත්සාහය ව්‍යවර්ථ විය.

ජාත්‍යන්තර මානුෂීය සංවිධානය (HSI) සමග එක්ව සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන එකමුතුව (Animal Welfare Coalition) වසර ගණනාවක් තිස්සේ මෙම පනත් කෙටුම්පත පනතක් දක්වා ගෙනඒමේ අවශ්‍යතාව සමාජගත කරමින් ඊට විවිධ අංශ ඔස්සේ මැදිහත් වෙමින් සිටියි. මේ දක්වාද එම මැදිහත්වීම යාවත්කාලීන කරමින් ඔවුන් විවිධ වැඩසටහන් සංවිධානය කරයි. 

ජාත්‍යන්තර මානුෂීය සංවිධානයේ (HSI) මෙරට ප්‍රධානී නීතිඥ වොසිතා විජේනායක මහත්මියගෙන් අප මේ ගැන විමසා සිටියේය..

සත්ත්ව හිංසනය සම්බන්ධයෙන් තවමත් ක්‍රියාත්මක වන්නේ 1907 තරම් යල් පැනගිය නීතියි. මේ නිසා මහජන අදහස් විමසීමෙන් පසුව සැකසුණු සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත බලාත්මක කිරීමේ අවශ්‍යතාව වර්තමානයේ තදින් දැනෙන්නට පටන්ගෙන තිබෙනවා. දෛනිකව අසන්නට ලැබෙන සත්ත්ව හිංසනයට අදාල විවිධ සිදුවීම් ඊට කදිම උදාහරණ සපයනවා. ඒ නිසා අප රජයෙන් ඉල්ලා සිටින්නෙ සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත හැකි ඉක්මනින් පනතක් ලෙස පාර්ලමේන්තුවේ සම්මත කර,නීතියක් ලෙස බලාත්මක කරන ලෙස යැයි ජාත්‍යන්තර මානුෂීය සංවිධානයේ (HSI) මෙරට ප්‍රධානී නීතිඥ වොසිතා විජේනායක මහත්මිය පැවසුවාය.

සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන අධිකාරියක් පිහිටුවීම, සත්ත්ව අයිතිවාසිකම් පිළිබද දැනුවත් කිරීම, සත්ත්වයන් ළග තබාගන්නා පුද්ගලයන්ගේ යුතුකම් සහ දඩුවම්වල ස්වභාවයන් වර්තමානයට ගැලපෙන පරිදි පුළුල්වන මෙම සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පතට මෙතරම් බාලගිරි දෝෂයක් ඇත්තේ ඇයිදැයි යන්න සත්ත්ව හිංසාවට විරුද්ධ සත්ත්ව ලෝලීන්ටත් උභතෝකෝටික ප්‍රශ්නයකි.

මෙම ගැටලුවට විසදුම් සෙවීමට ප්‍රමාද වෙද්දී අපට අසන්නට ලැබුණු සත්ත්ව හිංසනයේ ආසන්නම සිදුවීම වුයේ මීගමුව, මුන්නකරයේ, සිරිවර්ධන පෙදෙසේ කාන්තාවක විසින් මාස හයක රිච්බෑග් බලු පැටියෙකු පොළොවෙ ගසා මරණ ලද බව කියන සිදුවීමකි.

අදාල බලු සුරතලා පසුගිය දිනෙක අසල්වැසි නිවසේ මුළුතැන්ගෙට රිංගා ඇති අතර එහි බීමතින් සිටි කාන්තාව බලු පැටියා ඔසවා පොළොවෙ ගසා ඇති බව කියයි.

මීගමුව පොලිසියේ විවිධ පැමිණිලි අංශයේ පොලිස් සැරයන් ප්‍රේමකුමාර (52282) කාන්තා පොලිස් නිලිධාරිනි සංජීවනී (6792) එක්ව සැකකාර කාන්තාව අත්අඩංගුවට ගෙන අධිකාරණයට ඉදිරිපත් කර තිබිණි.

මෙවැනි සිද්ධි අරඹයා බලාත්මක විය හැකි සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත් කෙටුම්පත මේ දක්වා කෙටුම්පතකට සීමා වී  තිබුණද එය පනතක් ලෙස බලාත්මක කරගන්නා තුරු දැනට පවතින 1907 සත්ත්ව හිංසනය වැළැක්වීමේ ආඥා පනත ඔස්සේද චුදිතයන්ට දඩුවම් ලබාදීමේ හැකියාව තිබේ.

බල්ලෙකු වෙඩි තබා ඝාතනය කළ පුද්ගලයෙකුට මාස තුනක සිර දඩුවමක් ලබා දුන් අධිකරණ ඉතිහාසය එවැනි සිදුවීම්වල නීතිය බලාත්මක වු අකාරය මොනවට පැහැදිලි කරයි. මේ සියල්ල අතරේ සත්ත්ව සුබ සාධන පනත අද නොවේ හෙට බාලගිරියෙන් මුදාගැනීම ඔබ අප සියලු දෙනාගේ වගකීමය.

රමේෂ් වරල්ලෙගම 


Need for Immediate Enactment of the Animal Welfare Bill

By Avanthi Jayasuriya

Last year witnessed an escalation in the incidents of animal cruelty in Sri Lanka, ranging from the culling of strays and the culling of elephants. While the cruelty prevails, there remains a marked lacuna in terms of the laws and regulations that govern issues related to animal welfare in the country, causing the perpetrators to go unpunished and victims to be left without justice. Moving forward in 2018, it is imperative and timely to reflect on the current status of the long overdue Animal Welfare Bill.

   (C) Creative Commons

Existing legislation relating to animal welfare

In Sri Lanka, the legislature on animal welfare is determined by the framework provided under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907. The Ordinance was last amended in 1955 and has since seen no changes. Among the many shortcomings of the outdated legislation, the definition of the term “animal” can be highlighted as limited and narrow. The 1907 Ordinance applies only to a domestic or a captured animal which includes any bird, fish, or reptile in captivity. Regardless of the increase in urban wildlife at present, the term has not extended its reach to incorporate urban wildlife within its parameters or punishment to offenders. It further excludes animals which are not domesticated or caged. This narrow perspective allows for very limited species of animals to be protected.

The concept of duty of care is another major deficiency in the Ordinance of 1907.  The concept refers  to responsible ownership of pets by their owners; the lack of which has drastic implications on the welfare of animals. Therefore, the inclusion of the concept is important in ensuring that pet owners will not abandon animals, and will act responsibly towards them by providing uninterrupted basic care. Moreover, the violation of such conduct would lead to legal prosecution and would lessen incidents of abuse at the hands of pet owners.

Status of draft Animal Welfare Bill

The need for a new legal framework to govern the issues related to animal welfare in the country was noted by many civil society organizations and as a result the new animal welfare bill was drafted in 2006 by the Law Commission, with the support of the interested parties. Almost a decade in the making, the draft bill was open for public comments under the Ministry of Rural Economic Affairs in 2015. Following the proposed changes received by the public consultation, the Cabinet approval for the Bill was received on January 13, 2016, after which the Bill was passed to the legal draftsman for the changes to be incorporated into it and for it to be drafted with the changes included. Yet, it has been over a year since the passing of the Animal Welfare Bill and the time for enactment has never been more urgent.

Recent measures taken to address animal welfare

The National Budget for 2018 had some considerations for animals and their welfare including the allocation of Rs. 75 Billion for the conversion of the zoo to an open zoo concept where the animals will no longer be caged, but be able to move around with more freedom as per international best practices. The Budget proposals also contained the restructuring of the Pinnawela elephant orphanage to be ‘Born Free-Chain Free’, initiating mahout training programmes. While these initiatives are commendable, ensuring animal welfare in the long run will fall short without a holistic legislative framework such as the Animal Welfare Bill in place which mandates the rules and regulations determining the welfare of animals.

Why the enactment of the animal welfare bill needs to be accelerated

In the past year, stories of extermination of stray cats and dogs within public and private premises and the culling of tuskers, cruelty towards captive elephants have become commonplace occurrences. These horrific acts of cruelty leave no doubt that it is time for more urgent and concrete action on animal welfare in the country.

It is high time that we changed these outdated laws and made sure that the long- overdue Animal Welfare Bill is passed for efficient action against cruelty to animals, where appropriate punitive action can be taken against offenders and issues relating to urban wildlife and captive animals can be solved in a comprehensive manner. In conclusion, it is pivotal that the Bill should be passed for enactment at the earliest possible, in order to provide for an effective and efficient legal framework to address cruelty towards animals in Sri Lanka.


Animal Welfare Bill in Need of Immediate Enactment

By Avanthi Jayasuriya

On November 22, the Cabinet approved a Bill focusing on elephants kept domestically, which also included banning young elephants being used for work. The regulations proposed by Sustainable Development and Wildlife Minister, Gamini Jayawickrama Perera are also reported as including a set of guidelines that should be adhered to by those seeking to rear domestic elephants. Some of the main areas of focus underlined include the responsibilities of the caretakers and owners towards the elephants kept domestically, regulations on elephants being used for work and the use of elephants in processions. This proposal also falls under amendments to Flora and Fauna Act No.22 of 2009.

While due appreciation is given to the positive change towards the treatment of elephants by seeking to prevent them from being subjected to cruelty, it also needs to be noted that it has been almost a year since the Cabinet approval for the draft Animal Welfare Bill was received. Unfortunately the Bill still remains at the Legal Draftsman’s office, while many animal welfare activists eagerly await its enactment. Almost a decade in the making, the draft bill was approved by the Cabinet following the public consultation that was last held in 2015. Following the proposed changes received by the public consultation, the Cabinet approval for the Bill was received on January 13, 2016. From this point, the Bill was passed to the legal draftsman for the changes to be incorporated into it and for it to be drafted with the changes included.

The last amendment to the law addressing cruelty to animals in Sri Lanka was made in 1955. The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907, under which the welfare of animals is taken into consideration is over a century old, with outdated fines and implemented on rare occasions and therefore in need of urgent reform.

Attorney-at-Law, Vositha Wijenayake, Convener of Animal Welfare Coalition of Sri Lanka said, “The AWC is appreciative of the changes proposed to safeguard elephants from being subjected to cruelty which were approved by the Cabinet. It is equally important to know when the proposed law on animal welfare will be enacted. This Bill has been on its way to get to this point for a very long time. I think everyone is eager to know when this could turn into law which will help uphold animal welfare in Sri Lanka.”

Civil Society Organisations and actors have highlighted the need for more humane animal welfare laws in the country for many years. As a result of these calls, the draft Animal Welfare Bill was tabled in Parliament. The Bill was presented to Parliament in October, 2010 by Venerable Athuruliye Rathana Thera as a private member bill. The new legislation proposed has as its objective the replacement of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907 and to recognise duty of care for persons in charge of animals to treat animals humanely, to prevent cruelty to animals, to secure the protection and welfare of animals, to establish a National Animal Welfare Authority and Regulations and Codes of Practice and to raise awareness on animal welfare.

“In order to have a good animal welfare system in Sri Lanka, it is important to have duty of care for persons in charge of animals to treat animals humanely, as well as having strong laws for those who cause cruelty to animals,” said Ms. Wijenayake. “We hear stories of cruelty to animals but without a law that is robust, it is not always helpful to take legal actions against the perpetrators who behave inhumanely and in a cruel manner towards animals,” she added.

The Animal Welfare Coalition of Sri Lanka which was set up with the objective of advocating and lobbying for a new animal welfare bill consists of numerous animal welfare organisations and volunteers keen on seeing the Animal Welfare Bill enacted. The member organisations and volunteers seek to actively engage in taking action to ensure that laws on animal welfare are efficient and effective and to protect animals from being subjected to cruelty.

“It is important that the Animal Welfare Bill is enacted to ensure effective and efficient laws on cruelty to animals in Sri Lanka. The current law dates back to 1907 and lacks in deterrent effect which prevents the protection of animals against cruelty. It is time we changed these laws and made sure that the long- overdue Animal Welfare Bill is passed for efficient action against cruelty to animals,” said Vositha Wijenayake.


Sri Lanka To Protect Domesticated Elephants: When Do We Enact The Animal Welfare Bill?

By Avanthi Jayasuriya

On November 22nd the Cabinet approved a bill focusing on elephants kept domestically. The regulations that were proposed by Sustainable Development and Wildlife Minister, Gamini Jayawickrama Perera included also a set of guidelines that should be adhered to by those seeking to rear domestic elephants. Some of the main areas of focus underlined include,  formalizing the way to maintain the places elephants are kept, maintaining their health, responsibilities of their owners and caretakers, caring of baby elephants born to such female elephants, deploying elephants in work, reproduction, using for perahera and video shootings, and attires for elephants. This proposal also falls under amendments to the Flora and Fauna Act No.22 of 2009.

Speaking on the recently approved Bill Ms. Deepani Jayantha, Veterinarian, Country Coordinator of Elemotion said, “Some of Sri Lanka’s recent developments and steps taken on securing elephant conservation and welfare is commendable. But with legislation, there is also the need for enforcement. I hope the implementation of the proposed Bill for the protection of elephants will come into effect soon.”

While due appreciation is given to the positive change towards the treatment of elephants by seeking to prevent them from being subjected to cruelty, it also needs to be noted that it has been almost a year since the Cabinet approval for the draft Animal Welfare Bill was received. Unfortunately the Bill still remains at the Legal Draftsman’s office while many animal welfare activists eagerly await its enactment. Almost a decade in the making, the draft bill was approved by the Cabinet following the public consultation that was last held in 2015. Following the proposed changes received by the public consultation, the Cabinet approval for the Bill was received on January 13, 2016. There onwards the Bill was passed to the legal draftsman for the changes to be incorporated into the Bill, and for it to be drafted with the changes included.

The last amendment to the law addressing cruelty to animals that Sri Lanka has seen, was in 1955. The Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907 under which welfare of animals is taken into consideration is over a century old, with outdated fines, and the implementation being on a rare occasion and therefore, is in need of urgent reforms.

Attorney-at-Law, Vositha Wijenayake, Convener of Animal Welfare Coalition of Sri Lanka said, “The AWC is appreciative of the changes proposed to safeguards elephants from being subjected to cruelty which were approved by the Cabinet. It is equally important to know when the proposed law on animal welfare will be enacted. This Bill has been on its way to get to this point for a very long time. I think everyone is eager to know when this could turn into law which will help uphold animal welfare in Sri Lanka.”

Civil Society Organisations and actors have highlighted the need for more humane animal welfare laws in the country for many years. As a result of these calls, the draft Animal Welfare Bill was tabled in Parliament. The Bill was presented to the parliament in October, 2010 by Venerable Athuruliye Rathana Thero as a private member bill. The new legislation proposed has as its objective to replace the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907, and to recognise duty of care for persons in charge of animals to treat the animals humanely, to prevent cruelty to animals and to secure the protection and welfare of animals, to establish a National Animal Welfare Authority and Regulations and Codes of Practice and to raise awareness on animal welfare.
“In order to have a good animal welfare system in Sri Lanka, it is important to have duty of care for persons in charge of animals to treat animals humanely, as well as having strong laws for those who cause cruelty against animals,” said Ms. Wijenayake. “We hear stories of cruelty to animals, but without a law that is robust, it is not always helpful to take legal actions against the perpetrators who behave inhumanely and in a cruel amnner towards animals,” she added.

The Animal Welfare Coalition of Sri Lanka which was set up with the objective of advocating and lobbying for a new animal welfare bill, consists of numerous animal welfare organisations, and volunteers keen on seeing the Animal Welfare Bill enacted. The member organisations and volunteers seek to actively engage in taking actions to ensure that laws on animal welfare are efficient and effective, and to protect animals from being subjected to cruelty.

“It is important that the Animal Welfare Bill is enacted to ensure effective and efficient laws on cruelty to animals in Sri Lanka. The current law dates back to 1907, and lacks in deterrent effect which prevents protection of animals against cruelty. It is time we change these laws, and make sure that the long over due Animal Welfare Bill is passed for efficient actions against cruelty to animals,” said Vositha Wijenayake.


Call For Animal Welfare: Where’s The Animal Welfare Bill?

By Vositha Wijenayake

It has been years since Sri Lanka has been speaking of the Animal Welfare Bill which is due to be enacted to address the short-comings of the current laws on animal welfare. However the law is still not finalized, and is heard as having a push back due to certain interests of different actors.

The ongoing attempt to restructure the laws on animal cruelty in the country- the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Ordinance of 1907- has reached over a decade, though the Bill is yet to be enacted. Many actors including key animal rights and welfare activists have been instrumental in this process, and are questioning the cause of delay in the already Cabinet approved Bill from moving forward to get enacted.

(C) Creative Commons

Need for the Animal Welfare Bill

The law on animal welfare in Sri Lanka at the moment is over 100 years old. Enacted in 1907, there are sections of the Ordinance which are in need of urgent reform; as the fines and sanctions imposed on those violating the laws are outdated, and are very low for most to be deterred in violating them. Some examples include a LKR 100 fine for acts of cruelty to animals, which is extremely ineffective in upholding the intention of the Ordinance (which is to prevent cruelty to animals).

The last amendment to the law was in 1955, and since then there has been no significant reform made to it. In addition to the fines that are low, and not effective, there is also the need to bring all animals that could be victims to cruelty within the purview of the law available in Sri Lanka. The law does not apply to urban wild life, and is limited only to captured or domestic animals. In turn the law applies only to those animals that are in captivity, while excluding those that are not domesticated or caged, creating a very narrow application of the law.

Duty of Care

Many Sri Lankans have animals, or feed animals that are not domesticated such as urban wild life. However they do not take the responsibility towards the care of these animals. While they have a cat or dog that they would consider to be their pet, the kittens and puppies at most times are dropped off at public spaces. This points to the fact that the concept of duty of care is not prevalent amongst us, and it is not included in the 1907 Ordinance. Hence, responsible ownership is missing in the current laws on animal welfare in Sri Lanka.

The proposed Bill addresses this issue through the suggestion to have the concept of duty of care included in it, and the laws on cruelty towards animals including the mistreatment of animals that are urban wildlife, as well as not taking care of those animals that have been taken under one’s charge.

Enacting the Animal Welfare Bill

The proposed Animal Welfare Bill was first presented to the parliament in 2010 by Venerable Athuruliye Rathana thero. The Bill proposes a broader definition of “animals” and also recognizes duty of care for persons in change of animals. It further provides for humane treatment of animals and proposes the establishment of an independent National Animal Welfare Authority.

The Bill was expected to be finalized by the end of this year (at least the expectation of those keen on its enactment was that it would be enacted by end of 2016 with the support of the Cabinet and the Parliament). However at the moment, the Bill seems to be stuck in the pipeline and with not much progress.

It is important to understand the cause of this delay of a Cabinet approved Bill, and to be informed on when one could expect the Bill to be enacted at the soonest. With the current government promoting the values of a cruelty free nation, it is important that we look into preventing all forms of cruelty, and address them. Two questions remain: What/who is (if anyone/anything is) blocking the Animal Welfare Bill’s enactment? If there is no hindrance, why is the Bill not being enacted?